On the Huffington Post website, actor, write, and director Kevin Powell writes this blog about his experiences with Black and White perceptions, regarding the way he talks.

“You talk too white” is a phrase that ranks up at the top of the list of words and phrases that tick me off QUICKLY. I will echo the question that Powell asked in his post:

“How do you think black people are supposed to talk?”

It’s not the notion that I talk (or act) like this or that race, it’s the fact that, if you have even an ounce of articulation, it somehow changes your race (and believe me, I’m not the most articulate person in the black white world). I’ve dealt with it, my sister’s dealt with it, and some of my good friends from high school and college have dealt with it/are still dealing with it.

So, I offerdon’toffer an apology for the times that I’ve talked or acted “too white”:

I’m sorrynotsorry that my hair cut ain’t ‘on fleek’.

I’m sorrynotsorry that I don’t post about ‘my BAE’ or “my Boo”.

I’m mightprobablywon’t use ‘dis’ and ‘they’ more, instead of ‘this’ and ‘their’.

Am I saying this right?

Sorry, Articulation Analyzers – the way that I talked at 7, 17, and 27 (not counting expanded vocab) is the same way I talk at 37, the way I will talk at 47, and possibly at 117. I don’t have to justify or confirm my “Black Card” to anyone.